REASEARCH

srhkim@gmail.com

PROFESSIONAL INTERESTS

+ Human information behavior and digital technology in everyday life
+ Personal digital archiving, information management, and recordkeeping practices
+ Archives and preservation of digital documentary heritage
+ Personal digital data analysis, data curation, and digital humanities
+ Distance learning and online education

ON-GOING RESEARCH

+ [Affiliate Study] Digital preservation needs assessment for a privately-held personal digital collection
+ [Research Project] Cloud computing end-user trust, "Do I trust Google? An Exploration of How People Form Trust in Cloud Computing". With Ayoung Yoon (a PhD student at UNC)

RESEARCH OUTCOMES

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Personal digital archives: Preservation of documents, preservation of self
+ Dissertation, 2013 [PDF-LINK]

+ Abstract: This dissertation explores personal digital archiving practices, particularly in relation to the construction of self. Personal archiving is an everyday practice through which people manage and preserve documents that have particular meanings to them. This process involves a constant value assignment that is intertwined with the recollection of past events. The pervasive use of digital technology in everyday life has changed the nature of documents and how people interact with them; thus, it has an influence on archiving practices. Due to the increasing quantity and diversification of genres of digital documents, as well as rapid changes in technology, however, long-term preservation of digital documents becomes a challenging task for individuals, families, communities, organizations, and societies.
Recognizing personal archiving as a self-reflective practice that involves psychological and social processes of understanding, this study explores and interprets personal digital archiving practices in the context of how people make sense of their lives and construct their private and public selves.
In-depth case studies were used to gain a holistic understanding as close to research participants¡¯ perspectives as possible. Semi-structured narrative interviews were conducted with 23 individuals from various backgrounds, ranging in age from their early 20s to early 70s.
While participants share similar patterns of digital archiving in terms of management, each participant presents a wide variety of different thoughts and motivations behind their activities. While many participants tend to retain digital materials by default, the actions of selection and prioritization are embedded in their digital archiving practice. Data analysis results indicate that how people perceive and review their past and current life experiences, including relationships with others, how they see their roles in a social setting, and their personal philosophy of life, has an influence on the formation and continued retention of personal digital archives.
The results are discussed in relation to emotions and self-evaluation. Personal digital archiving as a process, directly or indirectly, involves a self-enhancement and self-verification which is an integral part of self-confirmation. This study contributes to the in-depth observation of everyday recordkeeping in a digital environment, particularly providing interpretive accounts of individual differences and why people do things in a certain way.

 

Landscape of Personal Digital Archiving Activities and Research
In Donald T. Hawkins (Ed.) Personal Archiving: Preserving Our Digital Heritage, Information Today, Inc. 2013.

Do I trust Google? An Exploration of How People Form Trust in Cloud Computing
Presented at the American Society for Information Science and Technology (ASIST) 75th Annual Meeting, Baltimore, MD, October 26-30, 2012.
+ Poster Presentation [PDF]

+ Abstract: The present study explores individual end-users, perspectives of cloud computing, especially issues regarding their trust/distrust of cloud services. While current cloud computing service development focuses on adoption by enterprises and organizations, individual endusers who use cloud services in their everyday lives also constitute an important consumer group. Challenges of trust in cloud computing have gained social and scholarly attention accompanied with the rise of privacy and data security concerns. Studies that investigate individual endusers?views of trust in cloud services, however, are rare. Using semi-structured interviews and a survey questionnaire, the present study aims to capture how ordinary individuals think about cloud computing and how they form their trust/distrust of cloud services and service providers. In this poster, authors present preliminary results of analysis of interview data.

What is your plan for your personal digital archives after your lifetime? Learning from individuals.
Presented at the Personal Digital Archiving Conference, San Francisco, CA, February 24, 2012.

+ Related Writing: The Results of One Scholar’s Survey: What Are Your Plans for Your Personal Digital Archives? [WEB], Posted on The Signal, the Library of Congress's blog, covering digital preservation related topics

+ Abstract: Currently, I am researching how individuals form their personal digital archives in relation to the construction of self. As part of this research, I am investigating what people think about the preservation of their personal digital archives beyond their lifetime. In this talk, I present my findings and also tdiscuss my interpretation of the findings.

From personal to social: How to build grassroots approach to preserve personal digital collections
(From personal to social: Are you willing to donate your personal digital documents to memory institutions?)
Presented at the Preservation Research Exchange (PREx) Symposium, University of Texas at Austin, February 18, 2012.

+ Abstract: As part of my dissertation study, I have asked participants if they are willing to donate their personal digital documents to memory institutions such as archives toward the end of their lives or after their lifetimes. Participants provided different answers with their own thoughts about personal and social values of their digital documents, what the act of donation means to them, and, further, their understanding of "memory institutions." In this presentation, I share themes emerged from what participants' answers and question how memory institutions - that traditionally have more focused on collecting papers from public figures or well-known people - can think of and approach to long-term preservation issues for digital documents produced, collected, and retained by "ordinary" individuals.

Personal digital archives: Preservation of documents, preservation of self
+ Dissertation proposal, 2010 [PDF]

+ Abstract: Personal archiving is a practice through which people manage and preserve documents that have particular meanings to them for a long time. The pervasive use of digital technology in everyday life changes the way that people interact with documents and thus have an influence on archiving practices. Viewing personal archiving as a self-reflective practice that involves psychological and social processes of reviewing, understanding, and presenting life and self, the proposed study aims to explore digital archiving of ordinary individuals in relation to the construction of self. It uses in-depth case studies to gain a holistic understanding of how people conduct and experience archiving in a digital environment as close to research participants' perspectives as possible.

Preservation Needs Assessment of Personal Digital Collection: Construction of Personal Digital Archives
Presented at the Annual Archival Education and Research Institute (AERI) Conference, Simmons College, Boston, July 14, 2011.

+ Abstract: This on-going case study describes a preservation needs assessment conducted for a personal digital collection that belonged to a person who was declared officially missing in a climbing accident. This study began with a request from family members who are concerned about the long-term survival of digital materials saved on personal computers of the man who died. The participating family values these remaining digital materials as primary memory objects that will help them to remember their beloved father, husband, son, and brother as a part of their family history. The objectives of the study are 1. to observe the current condition of the given digital materials, 2. to assess their digital preservation needs including what resources the family may need in order to play the role of archivists for the digital collection of their family member, and to provide the family recommended preservation methods and strategies.

Personal Digital Archives and the Archival Profession
Presented at the Annual Archival Education and Research Institute (AERI) Conference, UCLA, Los Angeles, July 10, 2009.
+ Research Presentation [Slides: PDF]

Using an Institutional Digital Repository for digital collections of retired faculty members
Presented at the Joint Conference on Digital Libraries (JCDL), June 16, 2009.
+ Poster Presentation [PDF]

Personal Digital Archives
presented at the Society of American Archivists (SAA) Annual Meeting, San Francisco, August 28-30, 2008.
+ Poster Presentation [PDF]

Kim, Sarah, Lorrie Dong, and Megan Durden. "Batch Archival Processing: Preserving Arnold Wesker's Digital Manuscripts." Archival Issues 30, no. 2 (2008): 91-106.
+ Paper [PDF]

Kim, Sarah, "Green Archives: Applications of Green Construction to Archival Facilities." Primary Source 28(1), 2008.
+ Paper [PDF]

Applications of Green Construction to Archival Facilities
Presented at the From Gray Areas to Green Areas: Developing Sustainable Practices in Preservation Environments Symposium, UT at Austin, November 1-2, 2007.
+ Poster Presentation [PDF]

Electronic Waste in Libraries and Archives
Presented at the From Gray Areas to Green Areas: Developing Sustainable Practices in Preservation Environments Symposium, UT at Austin, November 1-2, 2007.
+ Poster Presentation [WEB]

OTHER WORKS

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Symposium logo and website design work (9/2012-6/2013)
+ Archival Education and Research Institute (AERI): Austin, Texas 2013 [WEB]
+ Archival Education and Research Institute (AERI): Austin, Texas 2013 was a five-day conference for archival educators and doctoral students in Archival Studies, hosted by the School of Information, UT at Austin. I designed the conference logo, Website, and program.

Symposium organization and symposium logo and website design work (9/2006-12/2007)
+ From Gray Areas to Green Areas Symposium [WEB]
+ From Gray Areas to Green Areas: Developing Sustainable Practices in Preservation Environments was a two-day symposium to examine sustainable practices in cultural heritage preservation environments, hosted by the School of Information, UT at Austin. I reviewed presentation proposals, searched for session speakers and moderators, designed the symposium logo, designed and managed the symposium website, and published symposium proceedings online.

 

Android Phone Application Development (9/2011-12/2011)
+ As a team (with Trey Thomas, Holly Mendenhall, and Angela Barratt), developed an android application titled “Sun Jogger” that provides daily and location specific sunrise and sunset time information with an custom alarm, designed particularly for daily runners.
+ A final project of “Introduction to Java Programming” course at UT at Austin

Paper conservation work (2005-2006)
+ At the Department of Collections Management, New York State Archives
+ Performed paper conservation treatment including mending, filling, washing, guarding, removal of adhesive, encapsulation, surface cleaning, and re-housing
+ Trained by Maria Holden (Chief Conservator) and Sue Bove (Paper conservator) at the New York State Archives
+ Conservation work portfolio [WEB]

 

Miscellaneous recreational work
+ Johann Sebastian Bach, Well-tempered Clavie Prelude No. 1 in C major (BWV 846) (2011)